How To Make Collagen Rich Bone Broth

How To Make Collagen-Rich Bone Broth | Jills Home Remedies | Today I'm going to teach you how to not just make any bone broth, but collagen rich bone broth!

I was recently at a local health food store talking to the owner. We were discussing how bone broth can heal digestive issues and she told me that making broth with chicken feet produces a lot of healthy, healing collagen.

Now I’d been reading a lot on the internet about how important collagen is for joints and to slow down aging.

But chicken feet?! My curiosity got the better of me and I just knew I had to give this a try.

You have also likely heard the great benefits of collagen. And you’ve also likely heard how healing bone broth is. Today I’m going to teach you how to not just make any bone broth, but bone broth that is very rich in collagen.

Why Does Collagen Matter?

Collagen is a protein in the body that strengthens our hair, nails, teeth, and gives us strong, pain-free joints to name a few things. As our body ages, we produce less collagen which results in wrinkles, sagging skin, and joint pain. In fact, women will pay a lot of money to have collagen injections to slow down their aging! The good news for those of us that don’t have the money or desire to have collagen injections, we can add lots of collagen to our diet for just a few dollars.  

Why Bone Broth is So Good for You

 According to Dr. Josh Axe [1], bone broth is the number one thing you can consume to: 

  • Boost the immune system
  • Help heal joint pain
  • Bring a stop to food intolerances and allergies
  • Heal Leaky Gut Syndrome
  • Reduce cellulite

Bone broth is a nutrient dense food, meaning it has a lot of nutrients that are easy to digest and can bring about healing in the body. Cultures all over the world use bone broth as a base for many meals. I think this needs to become more of a practice in America as we eat mostly dead foods with no nutrition, and our health as a nation is evidence of that.

But what do I mean by bone broth? Many of us will roast a chicken or beef roast in the oven or crockpot and it makes a broth. While that broth is healthy and delicious to eat with cornbread and vegetables, that’s just broth and not the bone broth that I’m talking about.

Bone broth is cooking just the bones for at least 24 hours to make a more concentrated, nutrient dense broth to add to foods or to just drink on its own. So yes my family loves the broth from a roasted chicken, but I also desire to get the concentrated bone broth in our diets too. Bone broth is where true healing can come from! And it’s so super simple to make!

How To Make Collagen-Rich Bone Broth | Jills Home Remedies | Today I'm going to teach you how to not just make any bone broth, but collagen rich bone broth!

I froze most of my broth into ice cubes to use in recipes as needed. This makes things so easy!

How To Make Collagen Rich Bone Broth

You can make bone broth with any bones as I explain in this post, and you may get some collagen from it. You can tell you have collagen if it gels when it cools. But the way to get truly rich collagen, is to use animal feet as I mentioned above.

OK, so yes, I know that’s strange to those of you that are Americans, but do you know cultures all over use chicken feet often? That’s because they are full of tendons and cartilage that is full of collagen! You can use any animal feet, but I found chicken feet at the store that were already well washed and peeled, so I purchased those. Makes life easier.

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Is anyone else slightly horrified looking at a package of chicken feet?! I was horrified and excited all the same time when I found them at the store. Horrified because of how “freaky” they looked all skinned and packaged up, and excited because I knew the healthy broth they would make!

And does anyone notice the “chicken paws” label? Since when do chickens have paws? LOL This gave me and several people on social media a good laugh. Anyone know why they call them that on the label? I’m interested to hear if you do. :) 

If you use chicken feet directly from a farm, you will want to wash and clean them thoroughly and peel them to make sure all bacteria are gone. I’ve never peeled chicken feet, but you can see this post for those instructions.

Bone broth is SO easy to make! All you need is the bones, some raw apple cider vinegar, and mineral sea salt! You can add herbs and/or vegetables to make it even healthier and tastier, but that’s up to you! Be creative and do what you wish. I added astragalus to this broth in this post. I buy astragalus here.

And don’t worry if you just can’t quite bring yourself to use animal feet – just make broth with bones! You can even combine regular bones with the 

Ingredients

3 pounds chicken feet, or other animal feet/hooves
4 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons mineral sea salt

Directions

  • Place chicken feet in a crockpot.
  • Cover with water by 1-2 inches
  • Add vinegar, salt, and any herbs or vegetables you wish to.
  • Cover with lid.
  • Cook on low for at least 24 hours.
  • Strain out bones and use broth for soups, stews, etc.
Collagen Rich Bone Broth
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Ingredients
  1. 3 pounds chicken feet (or other animal feet/hooves)
  2. 4 tablespoons raw apple cider vinegar
  3. 2 tablespoons sea salt
Instructions
  1. Place chicken feet in a crockpot.
  2. Cover with water by 1-2 inches.
  3. Add vinegar, salt, and any herbs or vegetables you wish to.
  4. Cover with lid.
  5. Cook on low for at least 24 hours.
  6. Strain out bones and use broth for soups, stews, etc.
Jill's Home Remedies http://jillshomeremedies.com/

Have you ever made bone broth from animal feet? I’d love to hear your experience!

References

  1. #BoneBroth Benefits for Digestion, Arthritis, and Cellulite. (n.d.). Retrieved July 17, 2017, from https://draxe.com/the-healing-power-of-bone-broth-for-digestion-arthritis-and-cellulite/

How to Make Milk Kefir in 5 Easy Steps

 

How To Make Milk Kefir In Just 5 Easy Steps | Jills Home Remedies | Do you know milk kefir has billions of probiotics in just one tablespoon? Learn how to make milk kefir today in just 5 easy steps!

If you hang out at my house for very long, you’ll inevitably hear one of my children asking me to “make a shake, please”. We cannot stand to go a day without our “shake”. I love that they ask for this every day because the base that I use for these shakes is milk kefir!

Kefir is one of the healthiest things you can add to your diet. It’s a probiotic drink and so incredibly good for you. If you do it right, you can feed your family this homemade probiotic drink for a lot less than purchasing probiotics in pill form! (I do keep this probiotic on hand in case one of my girls has a tummy ache and can use some extra probiotics.)

I’m going to show you not only how to make milk kefir in 5 easy steps, but I’m going to share how you can make yours taste so yummy that your kids will be asking you for some too!

What is kefir?

Milk kefir, (there is such a thing as water kefir but we are going to go over milk kefir today) originating from Russia, is a fermented milk drink made with kefir grains. These grains are a bacterial fermentation starter that when added to milk, make a thick, creamy yogurt-type drink. 

How To Make Milk Kefir In Just 5 Easy Steps | Jills Home Remedies | Do you know milk kefir has billions of probiotics in just one tablespoon? Learn how to make milk kefir today in just 5 easy steps! Kefir grains look like cottage cheese or cauliflower to me. They feed on the sugar in the milk, which causes them to multiply themselves at a rate of a 10-15% increase each time they are fed. [2] If you keep your kefir grains well fed with milk, you can have a forever endless supply of inexpensive, homemade probiotics for your family’s good health.

Kefir boasts of high levels of probiotics, calcium, magnesium, vitamins k & b12, biotin, folate, and enzymes. [1] And according to the University of Florida microbiology class, homemade kefir contains a beneficial bacteria colony of 150 billion per tablespoon! [3]

What About Store-Bought Kefir?

While kefir bought at the store does have a lot of good stuff in it, it does not have as much as homemade. Many brands are advertised as having 10 strains, while homemade kefir has as many as 40-60 strains. [2]

And let’s just mention the savings! The savings of making your own kefir is well worth it. Purchasing kefir is around $.12 an ounce, while making it only costs you the price of milk (once you’ve purchased your grains) and averages to being only $.02 an ounce. [2] (This price was based on milk being $2.75 a gallon, so if you purchase milk that is less expensive, you save even more!) 

How To Make Milk Kefir in 5 Easy Steps

Note: When you purchase kefir grains, they will be in a bag of milk. Strain the grains using a plastic strainer and pour a little bit of fresh milk on them to rinse them. This is only necessary when you use them the first time. This helps to activate them and get them going since they’ve been tossed about in the mail and are now in a different environment. Do not rinse with water. 

Ingredients

Kefir grains (buy here)
Milk (raw or whole milk)
Jar
Breathable material like paper towels, dish towel
Rubberband

Directions

  1. Place kefir grains in a jar.
  2. Pour in milk on top of the grains. Use 1 cup of milk per 1 tablespoon of grains. 
  3. Place a breathable cloth on top and secure with a rubber band. I like to use a paper towel folded in half, but a dish towel or something similar would work as well.
  4. Place the jar in a cool, dark place like a cabinet. Let the kefir ferment for 24-48 hours. You will know that it’s ready when you tilt the jar slightly and the kefir is thicker and more gel-like instead of just watery milk.
  5. Strain the kefir in a plastic strainer. (Never use a metal strainer or spoons. The kefir liquid itself can touch metal but the grains cannot as this can “kill” them.)

A Few Notes and Tips

  • Be patient with your grains as they adjust to a new environment. Every household has different temperatures and moisture content so your new grains have to get used to your house. After you make your first batch, the liquid may still be watery and not very thick at all. That’s OK! It doesn’t mean the grains are bad – it only means they need more time to adjust to your environment. Simply strain the kefir grains, place them in a jar, and pour more fresh milk in. The second time around you can add only 1/2 cup and see if it does better starting with that amount. Sometimes it can take 2 or 3 times to get them started well. Once they have a good start and are adjusted to your home’s environment, they will make lots of amazing kefir for years to come!
  • Some people pour up their kefir after 24 hours, but I tend to wait every 48 hours because I have so many grains now that I make 1/2 a gallon at a time and we currently don’t need more than 1/2 a gallon of kefir every 2 days. It also saves on milk money if I wait 2 days. 
  • In the summer and warmer weather, they will ferment faster and the kefir may be ready every day to be strained. The refrigerator slows down fermentation, so I place the jar in the refrigerator if I’m too busy to strain them at the time the kefir is ready or if I want them to ferment more slowly for a few days. (I always ferment in the cabinet first for at least 24 hours before placing them in the fridge.)
  • Don’t throw your grains out if you forget to strain them within 48 hours. Everything is still good, your kefir will just be stronger and more sour, but still usable! If you leave your grains in the basement for a year and forget about them, then yes- throw them out and start over with more grains. (I’ve actually done that in the early days! haha)
  • If you don’t have someone local to you to get kefir grains from, you can buy them online! You do have to be sure you get them from a good source. I had an experience once when I ordered kefir grains and when I opened the package, they smelled like a dead mouse. Needless to say, I threw those away and ordered from Yemoos Nourishing Cultures. I’ve had great success with these grains and their customer service is extremely helpful!
  • Be sure to use raw or whole milk for your kefir grains. Ultra-pasteurized, low-fat, coconut, rice, soy, etc. milk will not work.
  • So what can you do with all these extra kefir grains? As I said, the grains will multiply as you use and feed them. So if you want to make a quart jar at a time, you’ll only need 4 tablespoons of grains for each batch. When your grains become more than that, you can eat them yourself (which I’ve never done personally), blend them with your smoothie (which I have done and that greatly increases the amazing nutritional value!), mix them in your animal’s food, or share with a friend!

How To Make Milk Kefir In Just 5 Easy Steps | Jills Home Remedies | Do you know milk kefir has billions of probiotics in just one tablespoon? Learn how to make milk kefir today in just 5 easy steps!

How To Make Milk Kefir in 5 Easy Steps
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Ingredients
  1. Kefir grains
  2. Milk
  3. Jar
  4. Breathable material like paper towels, dish towel
  5. Rubberband
Instructions
  1. Place kefir grains in a jar.
  2. Pour in milk on top of the grains. For the first batch, add around 1 cup of milk per 1 tablespoon of grains.
  3. Place a breathable cloth on top and secure with a rubber band. I like to use a paper towel folded in half, but a dish towel or something similar would work as well.
  4. Place the jar in a cool, dark place like a cabinet. Let the kefir ferment for 24-48 hours. You will know that it's ready when you tilt the jar slightly and the kefir is thicker and more gel-like instead of just watery milk.
  5. Strain the kefir in a plastic strainer. (Never use metal strainer or spoons. The kefir liquid itself can touch metal but the grains cannot as this can "kill" them.)
Jill's Home Remedies http://jillshomeremedies.com/

How To Make Kefir Taste Yummy

Kefir is similar to yogurt, so flavor it and use it as you would yogurt. Plain kefir is sour, but you can add sugar, honey, berries, etc. to make it taste good. As I mentioned, my favorite way to use it is by making what we call “shakes” (or smoothies).

For every cup of kefir, we add 1 1/2-2 frozen bananas, about 1/4 cup peanut butter, 2 tablespoons of flax or chia seeds, and any herbs that I wish to add to our diet at the time. (Right now I’m adding 1 teaspoon of turmeric.)  This is our favorite way, but the options are endless! Experiment and have delicious fun!

Do you make your own kefir? What’s your favorite way to drink it?

Resources

  1. 7 Kefir Benefits and Nutrition Facts. (2017, March 28). Retrieved March 31, 2017, from https://draxe.com/kefir-benefits/
  2. Cultures, Y. N. (n.d.). Commercial Milk Kefir vs Home. Retrieved March 31, 2017, from https://www.yemoos.com/pages/commercial-milk-kefir-vs-home
  3. Surprising Probiotic Count Of Kefir Revealed. (2016, January 24). Retrieved March 31, 2017, from http://www.nourishingplot.com/2015/10/21/surprising-probiotic-count-of-kefir-revealed/